Hunting Articles and Reviews

Kalahari Hunting NamibiaSunrise in the Kalahari, Namibia

There are so many wonderful hunting articles about the Kalahari, Namibia, Africa and safaris.

We ought to remember that

"... writing is not a performance but a generosity"
(Brenda Ueland,1938).

I thought to share special hunting articles here with you so that you will know where to find good reading material that will interest you - all on a few pages!

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African Hunting Stories

Have you noticed our
"African Hunting Story"-page?

Read about more experiences in Africa...


Links to Hunting Articles

1. Africa Hunt Review  by John Palffy, Australia

2. You Only Go Around Once... by Roger Libby

3. Five Calibers for International Hunting  by Steve Hofmann

4. Africa Hunting for Women by Terri McIntosh

5. Guns and Ammo For Your Next Trip  by Terry Blauwkamp

6. African Safari Costs... what to keep in mind  by Terry Blauwkamp

7. What to Say to a Person Who Has Never Hunted  by Randall Eaton

8. Namibia Travel-and-Hunt Review  by Nancy Morris

9.  Trophy hunting buoyant industry for Namibia

10. Hunting...definition and history

11.  First Hunt in Africa by Tienie Duvenhage

12.  A brown hyena hunting-experience in the Kalahari by Jim Jones

13. Safe Hunting Guidelines

14. Why Africa?  by John MacDonald


Hunting in NamibiaRick and Karen hunting with Uitspan Hunting Safaris



SBI! Case Studies


Meaning of "Uitspan"

'Uitspan' is an Afrikaans word that means place of rest.

When the Boer settlers moved inland in Southern Africa in the 1800's, they used ox carts. When they found a spot with game, water and green grass, they arranged their ox carts into a circular laager for protection against wild animals and stopped for a rest.

They referred to such an action of relaxation for man and beast, as Uitspan.

(Picture above of our ancestors.)


Did you know?

Greater Souther Kudu
Greater Southern Kudus are famous for their ability to jump high fences. A 2 m (6.56 ft) fence is easily jumped while a 3 m (9.84 ft) high fence is jumped spontaneously. These strong jumpers are known to jump up to 3.5 m (11.48 ft) under stress.

Read detailed info on the Kudu antelope



I created our website with the help of SBI.

Click here

to read about my experience...

Did you know?

Kalahari Lion

Some animals have one sense more than man!

The flehmen response is a particular type of curling of the upper lip in ungulates, felids and many other mammals. This action facilitates the transfer of pheromones and other scents into the vomeronasal organ, also called the Jacobson's Organ.
This behavior allows animals to detect scents (for example from urine) of other members of their species or clues to the presence of prey. Flehming allows the animals to determine several factors, including the presence or absence of estrus, the physiological state of the animal, and how long ago the animal passed by. This particular response is recognizable in males when smelling the urine of a females in heat.

Click here to read how the Kudu antelope use this sense.